Character houses, the weird, wonderful, and the easily approved...

As private consultant planners, we see all kinds of extensions requiring approval for various different reasons. We see public notifiable Impact Assessable development applications with 4-7 month timeframes, which require approval over 1sqm of extension. We see small residential carport extensions that cost more to gain the approval than they do to build the thing, but we also see building work that doesn't require approval that certainly should require approval...

Being a Friday afternoon, we thought it might be fun to have a laugh at some wild potential extensions that would be considered 'Accepted/Exempt'. Enjoy!

Here we have an original pre-1947 Dwelling house in a beautiful traditional streetscape with the Traditional Building Character overlay and within a Character Zone. So, a fairly high level of protection is over this property in relation to demolition and extensions...


Character house

Wouldn't it be a shame if someone built a 6m x 6m x 9.5m high carport in front of it? Yes, but it doesn't require any approval from Council under 'Table 5.3.4.1 - Prescribed Accepted Development'.


carport extension

What about a 2m high solid block wall fence? Or maybe an open brickwork fence? Well, you don't need approval for that either...

Character house fence

I mean, if the above were to happen, at least the original house would still maintain its beautiful traditional character... unless someone painted it pink and yellow, which they wouldn't require Council approval for...

pre-1946 house

At least they couldn't build a really modern art-deco style extension... well, unless it was rear of the existing house... In which case they could and they wouldn't require Council approval...

Traditional building character extension

And to really blow your Friday afternoon socks off.. let's raise the house up to 9.5m and have a 4m ceiling height downstairs and enclose it with bricks. Now that would be a laugh, and we wouldn't even require approval from Council!


raise and inbuild character house

Sometimes planning is confusing... when you're allowed to do all of the above without any Council approval, but so many small and simple extensions, like the ones below, would require $4000+ worth of approvals.

In these examples, they've only removed a small port-hole window and the other just enclosed a portion of downstairs for a bathroom, but they went outside of the existing building perimetre.

alteration of pre-war home
extension to character house

But that's just how it is... Maybe pink houses with giant fences and out of place art-deco extensions are the way forward... Well maybe not, but they're definitely more affordable when it comes to Council approval!